Building your photo business: WordPress Blogs

Eric Leuthardt Photography and 7th Circle Designs present Building your photo business: WordPress Blogs.

Building your photo business: WordPress Blogs

Have you ever wanted to share you photos on the web but just weren’t sure how to go about doing it? Join us for another Photography 101 course, this one on creating your own presence on the web with a WordPress blog.

Face it, whether you are taking pictures that you wish to show to your own family, or show to other photographers, or perhaps to even show to prospective clients, you need some way to easily showcase these images on the web. This workshop will walk you through the steps of creating a basic WordPress blog for you to post images to, tell the world about your photography, share images with family & friends, provide a way for you to promote your photography and much, much, more! This class will teach you how to set up a WordPress blog and get started posting to share your photography with anyone!

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Price: 39.00 USD
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Building your photo business: The art of Social Media

Eric Leuthardt Photography and 7th Circle Designs present Building your photo business: The art of Social Media.

Building your photo business: The art of Social Media

Do you have a photography business or a photo blog? Do you want to draw more traffic to your site? Are you confused about social media and what it can do for you? Well join us for another Photography 101 course, focusing on creating your own presence on the web and marketing yourself.

Whether you’re uploading pictures to show to your family, other photographers, or even prospective clients, you need some way to easily draw traffic to your website. This workshop will cover the basics of branding, creating an online presence, and marketing your business or personal site using free tools available to everyone. When we are done you will have the knowledge of how to tell the world about your photography, share images with family & friends, provide a way for you to promote your photography and much, much more!

Webinar
Price: 39.00 USD
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WordPress 3.6 “Oscar”

The latest and greatest WordPress, version 3.6, is now live to the world and includes a beautiful new blog-centric theme, bullet-proof autosave and post locking, a revamped revision browser, native support for audio and video embeds, and improved integrations with Spotify, Rdio, and SoundCloud. Here’s a video that shows off some of the features using our cast of professional actors:

Introducing WordPress 3.6 “Oscar”

Introducing WordPress 3.6 "Oscar"

We’re calling this release “Oscar” in honor of the great jazz pianist Oscar Peterson. Here’s a bit more about some of the new features, which you can also find on the about page in your dashboard after you upgrade.

User Features

  • The new Twenty Thirteen theme inspired by modern art puts focus on your content with a colorful, single-column design made for media-rich blogging.
  • Revamped Revisions save every change and the new interface allows you to scroll easily through changes to see line-by-line who changed what and when.
  • Post Locking and Augmented Autosave will especially be a boon to sites where more than a single author is working on a post. Each author now has their own autosave stream, which stores things locally as well as on the server (so much harder to lose something) and there’s an interface for taking over editing of a post, as demonstrated beautifully by our bearded buddies in the video above.
  • Built-in HTML5 media player for native audio and video embeds with no reliance on external services.
  • The Menu Editor is now much easier to understand and use.

Developer features

  • A new audio/video API gives you access to metadata like ID3 tags.
  • You can now choose HTML5 markup for things like comment and search forms, and comment lists.
  • Better filters for how revisions work, so you can store a different amount of history for different post types.
  • Tons more listed on the Codex, and of course you can always browse the over 700 closed tickets.

Reprinted from WordPress

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Passwords and Passphrases, you’re most common security measure

The first and most common piece of security everyone is aware of and using is a password or hopefully a passphrase. Today I will outline the differences between the two along with some guidelines and suggestions. In part 2 of my coverage about passwords I will go into more detail about some things to look out for when creating and using passwords.

About passwords and passphrases

Passwords are short sequences of letters, numbers, and symbols that you enter to verify your identity to a system, which then allows you access to secure data or other resources.

Passphrases operate on the same principle as passwords, and are used in exactly the same way. However, they differ from traditional passwords in two aspects:

  • Passphrases are generally longer than passwords. While passwords can frequently be as short as six or even four characters, passphrases have larger minimum lengths and, in practice, typical passphrases might be 20 or 30 characters long or longer. This greater length provides more powerful security; it is far more difficult for a cracker to break a 25-character passphrase than an eight-character password.
  • The rules for valid passphrases differ from those for passwords. Systems that use shorter passwords often disallow actual words or names, which are notoriously insecure; instead, your password is usually an apparently random sequence of characters. The greater length of passphrases, by contrast, allows you to create an easily memorable phrase rather than a cryptic series of letters, numbers, and symbols.

What makes a password or passphrase strong?

A strong password:A strong passphrase:
  • Is at least eight characters long.
  • Does not contain your user name, real name, or company name.
  • Does not contain a complete word.
  • Is significantly different from previous passwords.
  • Is 20 to 30 characters long.
  • Is a series of words that create a phrase.
  • Does not contain common phrases found in literature or music.
  • Does not contain words found in the dictionary.
  • Does not contain your user name, real name, or company name.
  • Is significantly different from previous passwords or passphrases.

Strong passwords and passphrases contain characters from each of the following four categories:

Character categoryExamples
Uppercase lettersA, B, C
Lowercase lettersa, b, c
Numbers0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
Symbols found on the keyboard (all keyboard characters not defined as letters or numerals) and spaces` ~ ! @ # $ % ^ & * ( ) _ – + = { } [ ] \ | : ; ” ‘ < > , . ? /

A password or passphrase might meet all the criteria above and still be weak. For example, Hello2U! meets all the criteria for a strong password listed above, but is still weak because it contains a complete word. H3ll0 2 U! is a stronger alternative because it replaces some of the letters in the complete word with numbers and also includes spaces.

 

Help yourself remember your strong password or passphrase by following these tips:

  • Create an acronym from an easy-to-remember piece of information. For example, pick a phrase that is meaningful to you, such as My son’s birthday is 12 December, 2004. Using that phrase as your guide, you might use Msbi12/Dec,4 for your password.
  • Substitute numbers, symbols, and misspellings for letters or words in an easy-to-remember phrase. For example, My son’s birthday is 12 December, 2004 could become Mi$un’s Brthd8iz 12124, which would make a good passphrase.
  • Relate your password or passphrase to a favorite hobby or sport. For example, I love to play badminton could becomeILuv2PlayB@dm1nt()n.

If you feel you must write down your password or passphrase to remember it, make sure you don’t label it as such, and keep it in a safe place.

Guidelines for keeping your passwords and passphrases secure

  • Consider using passphrase vaulting.
  • Do not write your username and password or passphrase in the same place.
  • Never share your password or passphrase with anyone.
  • Never send anyone your password or passphrase via email, even if the message requesting your password seems official. A request for a password or passphrase is very likely a phishing scam.
  • Change your password or passphrase at least every six months.
  • Do not use the same password or passphrase over multiple services or web sites.

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